Construction equipment stolen from Tiny and Ramara Township: OPP

Two construction vehicles were reported stolen recently; one was taken from Tiny Township and the other from Ramara Township. Southern Georgian Bay OPP is asking for the public’s help locating a backhoe loader, which they say was stolen from a parking lot on . The theft reportedly took place sometime between 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 15 and 8 a.m. Monday Aug. 16. The stolen heavy equipment is described as a Caterpillar backhoe loader model 420F2 yellow in colour, bearing serial number CAT0420FTLYC00290 with a Duncor enterprises sign on the side. (See provided photo) Anyone with information about this alleged theft is asked to contact the OPP at 1-, , or by calling at 1-. Crime Stoppers took to Twitter seeking the public’s help locating another piece of construction equipment. A skid steer was stolen from the area of in Ramara between Aug. 13 and 16. (See provided photo) The model is 40XT and the serial number is JAF0347371.  Call Crime Stoppers 1-, or . 

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Cellphone data shows people are on the move again. What mobility patterns tell us about ‘leaky lockdowns’ and a possible third wave

New variants are spreading, the vaccine rollout is still sputtering, and Ontario’s decline has stalled, with troubling signs the curve could be bending back up again. Meanwhile, restrictions are loosening across the province — meaning more Ontarians are on the move. All of this, combined with a heavy dose of lockdown fatigue, makes for an unnerving mix at a critical juncture. Experts are warning of a third wave and pointing to a constellation of troubling signs: roughly 30 per cent of tests are now screening positive for variants of concern, up from about seven per cent a month ago. Several public health units are starting to trend in the wrong direction and Ontario’s biggest hot spots — Toronto and Peel — have just ended stay-at-home orders. Mobility levels across the province are also on the rise. Since the pandemic began, has been used as an imperfect proxy measure for how people are behaving. While this type of data comes with significant caveats — and new research is questioning whether mobility data is still as predictive as it was in the first wave — mobility levels have historically been a good indicator of where the pandemic is headed, experts say. “It gives us a little bit of an early warning signal to what may be in store in the weeks ahead,” said Kevin Brown, a Public Health Ontario scientist who recently co-authored a . “If you see large upswings in mobility, or large drops in mobility, usually you can e […]

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Martin Regg Cohn: With a fourth wave looming, Doug Ford must make vaccinations mandatory

The deadly results are in: Canada keeps failing the COVID test that truly counts. No, I’m not talking about the clinical test for viral infection. I mean the litmus test of leadership that would make vaccination the price of admission in mid-pandemic. Yes, the failure lies at every level — not merely provincial but federal, and not just politicians but public servants. The blame begins with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and extends to every provincial premier, notably Ontario’s Doug Ford. But it also rests with our public medical officers of health across Canada who have hemmed and hawed from start to finish. The truth is that they have collectively lost their tongues and failed to stick their necks out, refusing to say what needs to be said now more than ever in order to save lives: Vaccination is not up for negotiation. Without it, lives will be lost and livelihoods destroyed. With a fourth wave looming, it must be made mandatory. Not by holding people down to inject them, but by holding them back when they aim a gun at our heads by refusing, recklessly, to take basic precautions against spreading infections. After all this time, we are out of time. We’ve had 18 months since COVID took root in Canada to think this through — and through. We have heard the explanations and excuses: Earnest questions about freedom and fairness; endless queries about equity and efficiency; academic rhetoric about Charter rights and human hesitancy or multicultural […]

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As Delta spreads in Ontario, here’s what we know about the risks to kids, and how to limit them

For nine-year-old Rosalie Byrne, the first sign of trouble was an ache inside her belly. “I’m feeling yucky,” she told her parents. When Rosalie tested positive for , her parents were told she’d likely feel better in a couple of days. But her symptoms worsened; food started tasting off, the humid air smelled repulsive, and she began to cough and struggle for breath. When she started vomiting uncontrollably, her parents knew it was time to go to hospital. So at 3 a.m. on Aug. 3, Nathalie Byrne comforted her terrified, crying daughter on the bathroom floor as her husband, David, grabbed what they needed. On the drive to Lakeridge Health, the closest hospital to their Oshawa home, David realized his five-year-old son never got to say goodbye. What if he never saw Rosalie again? Back home, Nathalie wondered the same. “I was just so scared,” she said. “You don’t know what this thing is going to do.” After 17 months of living cautiously — virtual schooling, masking at playgrounds, minimizing contacts — Rosalie joined a tiny but growing number of Ontario kids who have been hospitalized with Delta, the variant now driving Canada’s fourth wave. In Canada, relatively few kids have been hospitalized since the pandemic began — 1,429 as of Aug. 13, just 1.9 per cent of total COVID hospitalizations, according to the Public Health Agency of Canada. Even with Delta, infected kids are far less likely to suffer sever […]

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Ontario sends vaccines for people aged 60-64 to some doctors and pharmacies

Ontario is casting a wider net with , arming a small number of family doctors with AstraZeneca shots for adults in their early 60s in addition to 327 in the Toronto, Windsor and Kingston areas. But the retired general in charge of Ontario’s vaccination task force warned demand will exceed supply for now with about 1 million people in the 60-64 age category across the province and 194,500 doses available. “Clearly we don’t have nearly enough to do all of them or even close to it yet,” Rick Hillier said Wednesday. He urged residents of the three areas not to book appointments or go on wait lists at multiple pharmacies, fearing that will “clog up the system.” Critics warned the lack of a one-stop booking system for shots across the province creates a “free-for-all” that could lead to frustration in trying to get through to pharmacies, no-shows for appointments and wasted doses. “This is exactly why we needed the online booking portal ready by March 1,” Green Leader Mike Schreiner said of the system slated to open Monday with a phone hotline. Both services are opening only to those 80 and older before moving to younger age groups. There was confusion over who, exactly, qualifies for shots in what a government news release called the “60-64” age category “as defined by year of birth between 1957-1961.” This prompted the government to release a statement to clarify eligibility, adding flexibility. & […]

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Documents reveal the Trudeau government warned Donald Trump not to cut off Canada’s supply of critical COVID-19 masks — or else

OTTAWA— Or else. New documents show the Liberals warned the U.S. that if it did, important Canadian exports to the U.S. would also be on the line. In April, Canada was caught off-guard when then-president Donald Trump invoked the Defense Production Act to order a to American exports of 3 million much-needed specialized medical masks made by 3M and other medical supplies like ventilators to Canada and Latin American markets. Publicly, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada would not retaliate, that his government was working to ensure the U.S. understood trade in essential medical supplies goes both ways across the border. However previously unreported emails among a massive pile of documents tabled with the Commons show senior officials in the Prime Minister’s Office and Canada’s ambassador in Washington, Kirsten Hillman, worked out a hardline strategy for a key phone call between chief of staff Katie Telford and “JK” — Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner. It was Friday night, April 3, just hours after Trudeau had publicly reminded everyone that nurses and health professionals co-operate across the border at Windsor and Detroit. But in private, the message delivered to Kushner was punchier, not just how “highly integrated” the cross-border supply chains are. There was an implicit warning. Brian Clow, head of the Canada-U.S. policy team at the PMO, in an email to Telford said she needed to make clear to K […]

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