Will full FDA approval of COVID-19 vaccines in the U.S. prompt some Canadian ‘fence-sitters’ to get the shot?

With U.S. officials reportedly poised to approve the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine within weeks, many are hoping this final endorsement could nudge some hesitant people toward the shot. The vaccine is already fully approved by Health Canada. But some experts say the final stamp of approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may also help convince some Canadians who are on the fence, and even persuade some large institutions to mandate vaccines. “I don’t know if people hear it from movies or commercials that say, ‘This is FDA-approved,’” said Janessa Griffith, a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto and Women’s College Hospital who has studied coronavirus vaccine hesitancy. “But that acronym has kind of become ingrained in us.” The that the FDA has sped up its timetable to fully approve the Pfizer shot, and expects the process to be completed by the start of September. The vaccine is currently authorized for emergency use along with those produced by Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. Griffith recently published research that mined thousands of tweets on COVID vaccines for patterns in hesitancy. The U.S. emergency authorization is one of the first things she sees people mentioning on social media as a reason not to get the shot, even if they have received vaccines for other diseases in the past. “Because we’re so influenced by what happens south of the border, I think it would be a good thing for it to be offic […]

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‘HIGH RISK’: Major recall of curry sold at stores across Canada due to allergy fears that ‘may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction’

Both Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) are warning shoppers about multiple curry products that are being recalled due to serious allergy concerns. Nomad Nutrition is recalling Nomad Nutrition brand Caribbean Curry from the marketplace because it contains undeclared mustard and split pea which are not declared on the label and Nomad Nutrition brand Kathmandu Curry from the marketplace because it contains undeclared mustard which is not declared on the label, the CFIA said in its People with an allergy to mustard or split pea should not consume the recalled products, the CFIA added. “Check to see if you have the recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased,” the CFIA said. “If you have an allergy to mustard or split pea, do not consume the recalled products as they may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction.” The products have been sold nationally and through Internet sales, the CFIA said. This recall was triggered by a consumer complaint. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings. The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing the recalled products from the marketplace. Here are photos of the recalled products:

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‘A wonderful honour:’ Collingwood arts foundation names 2021 Clerkson Award winner

Chantal Wolf is the recipient of the , presented by the . Working mainly in watercolour, acrylic and pen, Wolf finds joy, fascination and deep satisfaction through the creative process by following the what-ifs, happy accidents and possibilities. “Winning this award is such a wonderful honour,” Wolf said. “To be recognized in this way means a lovely opportunity to share my art and my passion for the creative process with more people. And hopefully to inspire some, along the way … or at least spread some beauty and joy.” Inspired by an exceptional art teacher in high school, Wolf studied illustration at Sheridan College, but is mostly self-taught. A diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease reignited her creativity and allowed her to reclaim the artist within. “This award confirms that I am on the right track by choosing to embrace the creative path as a way to navigate living with Parkinson’s Disease. Art and creativity have blessed me with so much, expanding my world and my work; bringing meaningful growth both personally and creatively, exciting opportunities, and experiences as well as lasting connections and cherished friendships with other incredible, inspiring artists. Then to add the thrill of winning this award, well that’s pretty amazing. I am so grateful.” With this award Wolf is excited to see where the paintbrush takes her next. “Now is my time to explore and expand my vision, to breathe life into what is wa […]

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‘Means a lot to me’: Whitby’s Jessica Klimkait talks about her Olympic success

What started out as a four-year-old taking judo has turned into an Olympic medal for Jessica Klimkait of Whitby. The 24-year-old on Monday, July 26. In fact, the summer has been an incredibly eventful one for Klimkait, as she won the world title in her weight category just weeks before the Tokyo Olympics began. “It’s been a crazy couple of months. I didn’t have a time to really acknowledge the world championships. Now I have to acknowledge that and acknowledge the Olympic medal. I’m obviously happy. These are two massive goals I wanted to achieve,” Klimkait said. Her medal is the first for a Canadian woman at the Olympics. The next day, she was joined by Catherine Beauchemin-Pinard, who also won a bronze in the women’s under-63kg division. Jessica’s long-time coach at the Ajax Budokan Judo Club is Kevin Doherty. “Super proud” is how Doherty described his emotion with her win. He coached for 15 years. Klimkait now lives in Montreal, where the National Judo Training Centre is. Doherty said Klimkait “always, always” stood out to her. “She was a very special student,” he noted. “At a young age, she never talked back. She did everything we asked of her, never spoke up and never missed a practice, even as a five-year-old. She was the first one there on the mat and the last one to leave,” he said. “Just a great student, just a great person to deal with. And, she loved the sport. That help […]

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Ontario a ‘week or 10 days’ away from easing more COVID-19 restrictions, top doctor says

Ontario remains a “week or 10 days” away from as vaccination rates slow and case counts rise, says chief medical officer Dr. Kieran Moore. Painting a picture of how the pandemic will unfold in the next few months, Moore said daily infection levels — which have almost doubled in the last two weeks to an average of 306 a day — will continue rising and “take off” sometime in the fall unless more people get their jabs to fight the contagious Delta variant. “The risk is going to rise in September as we head indoors,” he told his weekly news conference Tuesday. “The coming months will require vigilance … COVID-19 will be with us for some time.” He attributed the recent jump in cases to an easing of restrictions last month that allowed gyms, cinemas and restaurants to reopen indoors, and to the August civic holiday weekend where people “let down their guard.” Most of those people catching COVID have not been vaccinated, Moore said. Ontario has vaccinated about 72 per cent of people age 12 and up, just shy of the 75 per cent threshold for lifting capacity limits indoors at gyms, theatres and other venues. Gyms, for example, are now limited to 50 per cent capacity. In the months ahead, the province will rely on a combination of “basic public health measures” such as masking and hand washing to keep the virus in check in tandem with vaccinations, Moore said. Local medical officers will be able to […]

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