A classic car or new furniture?: Collingwood man celebrates $100,000 lottery win

Collingwood’s Daniel Krieger won $100,000 with OLG’s Encore and he plans to share the windfall with his siblings.  Krieger matched the last six of seven Encore numbers in exact order in the January 2, 2021 Ontario 49 draw to win. The 55-year-old car enthusiast, said he plays his father’s numbers in honour of his memory. “I was at home and checked my ticket using the OLG Lottery App. I started shaking – I couldn’t believe it” he said.  Krieger said he couldn’t sleep that night. “I kept checking it to make sure it was real,” he said. Krieger said he has lots to consider when it comes to the money.  “I’m going to share with my brother and sister and then I’m thinking about purchasing a classic car or some new furniture,” he said.  The winning ticket was purchased at

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Devastation brought by COVID-19 shows Ottawa must take over care for seniors

As Canada faces the reality of entering a fourth wave, COVID-19 continues to take an immense toll on Canada’s long-term-care sector, where conditions have reached crisis proportions for residents and staff. We’ve known for many years that Canada’s population is aging and that we face significant challenges in funding and staffing for long-term care. Tragically, it took a global pandemic and the avoidable deaths of thousands of seniors to finally shine a light on this longstanding crisis. Many of the critical challenges in this sector are the direct result of decades of underinvestment, privatization and regulation that is both fragmented and unenforced. The current patchwork of services and the reliance on for-profit care in many parts of the country has resulted in soaring costs, inadequate facilities, insufficient staff and few protections for the health and safety of residents and workers. Last summer’s release of the Canadian Forces’ troubling reports of the impacts of COVID-19 on predominantly private, for-profit long-term care facilities in Quebec and Ontario shocked the public and decision-makers, and highlighted the deplorable conditions faced by too many seniors and workers. To date, of all Canadian COVID-19-related deaths have taken place in long-term care. The sad reality is that these problems have persisted for decades out of the public eye. This was the culmination of an approach that has long privileged business practices based on […]

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Surge in used mattresses an issue that won’t be put to bed any time soon: Orillia staff

Orillians appear to be giving their bedrooms a second look, and it’s having an impact in the unlikeliest of places. The municipality is reporting a surge in the number of used mattresses and box springs arriving at its waste diversion site, a trend that is in turn driving up costs associated with recycling these materials. Staff suspects the higher volumes are rooted in the pandemic, as people re-evaluate their furnishings while spending more time at home. “With home renovations and things like that, people are looking at their furniture and potentially upgrading it,” said Greg Preston, manager of environmental services. “And when stores have sales on mattresses, we certainly see upsurges of deliveries of used mattresses here.” Recycling mattresses and box springs is critical as these bulky materials are difficult to compact and would otherwise take up a large volume of space in a landfill, staff noted. “They don’t break down very easily,” Preston said. Roughly 80 per cent of mattresses received at Orillia’s waste diversion site are sent away for recycling, save for those that are overly soiled, damaged or contain bed bugs. Those sent for recycling are stored in a container and shipped to Toronto-based Recyc-Mattresses, where the metal, wood, foam and fabric are separated and recycled. Prior to 2020, the city would typically transport five tractor trailer loads of mattresses and box springs for recycling annually, with eac […]

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‘Financial strain’: Pandemic continues to place pressures on Alliston animal shelter, veterinarians

It’s been a rough go for the Alliston and District Humane Society (ADHS) over the past year and a half, and there hasn’t been much relief for the volunteer-run organization this summer. Shelter vice-president Jane Clarke said there are many pressures facing the ADHS, many of which are pandemic-related. The shelter has seen an increase in surrenders of senior cats and dogs. She said this usually occurs when the owner dies, or is placed into a nursing home, leaving the pets with nobody to care for them. Senior animals usually have health issues that must be addressed before they are adopted. “This is putting quite a financial strain on the shelter,” she said. In general, she said, more animals have been surrendered to the shelter as of late. She said people claim they can no longer care for the animals due to allergies, because they are moving or due to financial stress, but there’s no way to know whether these reasons are true. With people spending less time at home now, it remains to be seen what will happen over the coming months. “I don’t think we will really know, until kids go back to school and summer is over, how much of this is attributable to the post-pandemic conditions and whether these numbers will increase,” she said. She said the number of surrender requests for domestic rabbits is way up, as are calls about abandoned rabbits. The shelter recently received a call to assist another shelter after six baby bunnies were […]

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Many major school ventilation upgrades won’t be ready by September. Here’s what you need to know about the precautions in place

It’s a critical tool to keep kids and teachers safe: good ventilation. But as in-person learning returns, some ventilation upgrades funded through a federal-provincial cost-sharing program will not be ready in time for September — with projected completion dates spanning into next year. All school boards will implement alternative measures set out by the province to limit spread such as installing air-purifying (HEPA) filters in all classrooms without mechanical ventilation, something Jeffrey Siegel, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Toronto, calls an “enormously important” step. But at where major ventilation upgrades won’t be ready for fall, careful monitoring and oversight of those alternative precautions will be key to safe in-person learning, said energy engineer David Elfstrom. More than two million elementary and secondary school students across the province head back to class in September at a time when infectious diseases experts warn the province has entered a fourth wave of COVID-19. Ontario students have spent 26 weeks outside the classroom since the pandemic began, and the province’s COVID-19 Science Advisory Table recently warned that school closures are particularly hard on low-income and racialized families. Including federal funding, Ontario has allocated more than $600 million to improving ventilation standards in schools during the pandemic. That funding began with $50 million in August of last year, w […]

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De Palma and Associates opens in Orillia, providing residents with legal representation

In the midst of a changing landscape for professionals in the legal world, Christina De Palma took the chance to expand her firm and provide legal services in Orillia and area. De Palma is the owner of De Palma and Associates, a legal firm that opened in Wasaga Beach in 2016. The firm opened its new location in Orillia on May 31. “We had done a few cases that took us to the various courthouses in Orillia,” said De Palma. “When I did some market research in Orillia, I noticed there were not many paralegal firms in the city offering the services that we do. I saw a need with how many people were representing themselves.” Aside from representing parties at landlord-tenant boards and assisting people with their traffic tickets, De Palma said the firm mainly deals with civil cases in small claim courts. She also said the firm assists individuals with their entry waiver applications to the U.S., assisting with record suspensions of criminal records and the mediation of divorce, neighbourly disputes, or employment issues. De Palma said opening her firm at a new location in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic was difficult. Like the rest of the legal world, adapting to the shift to an online format, with virtual courthouses and trials, brought on its own set of challenges. “We were not a profession that was technologically savvy at all. There was no Zoom court prior to the pandemic,” said De Palma. But even with the challenges, De Palma said that w […]

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‘Passerby’ finds dead body in Orillia woodland: OPP

Orillia OPP are investigating after a dead person was found in a wooded area of the city on Tuesday, Aug. 17, said Orillia OPP Const. Lori Barker. Police said they were called to the location shortly before 3 p.m. after a passerby came across the body, Barker said. Police are not releasing the location at this time. The Orillia OPP Crime Unit is assisting with this ongoing investigation.  Police said there is no risk to the safety of the public. “Based of the investigation at this point we’re not deeming it as a risk to anybody else’s safety,” Barker said.  Further information will be released after an autopsy examination, police said.  “We’ll be releasing more information once it becomes available,” Barker said.  If you have any information about crime in our community please contact the OPP at- or report minor occurrences online by visiting www.opp.ca/reporting. You can also call Crime Stoppers at , or submit your information online at .

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